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JAFSCD Sponsors American Farmland Trust Conference

 

AFT_Conf

 

Click above for details

 


New Report from the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture

 

Leo_ADO_ad

 

Click image to open report

 


 

 

Report Examines San Francisco Metro Area Food System

 

 

Locally_Nourished

 

Click image to open report

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Local_Meat

Click image to go to the report's page

 


 

 

Hudson Valley Study Points to Decentrailzed Food Hub Approach

 

Cover-page-HVFH-Report

 

Click image to download report

 

 


 

 

New County-Based Food System Assessment

 

Roomatthetablecover

 

Click image to download report

 

 


 

 

New Report From Our Friends in Canada

 

DeltaCommunityFarmDistrict_2012-coverpage

 

Click image for more information about the plan and a link to the document

 

 


 

 

From the Food Chain Workers Alliance

 

Food-Insecurity-Restaurant-Workers-Cover

 

Click image to get the PDF

 


 

 

From the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

 

 

A Report on Best Practices in Urban Food Policy


Pages_from_City_Food_Policy__Programs_web

 

Click image to download copy

 


 

 

NEW Report from GREEN for ALL


Green2-Logo

 

Click image above to go to the report's page at Green for All.

 

 


 

 

NEW Food Hub Resource Guide

 

From the

ARS/USDA and Wallace Center at Winrock International

 

Food_Hub2

 

Click image to see the USDA AMS page

 


 

NEW FROM THE USDA

Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food Compass Map


Compass

 

This interactive map shows many USDA-supported projects and programs related to local and regional food systems for the years 2009-2011. CLICK ON MAP TO GO TO COMPASS

 


 

NEW FOOD HUB REPORT FROM ILLINOIS!



Food_Hub

 

CLICK IMAGE TO GET THE PDF

 

 


 

 

Food_Roads

 

From the producer:

The Institute at the Golden Gate’s Food for the Parks initiative aims to expand the availability of nutritious, local, and sustainable fresh food to park visitors nationwide. This program leverages the food purchasing power of the National Park Service (NPS) and its supply chain to affect food systems in the U.S. and beyond. The Institute created two publications that parks and food service providers can use to take the next steps.

 

Food for the Parks: Case Studies of Sustainable Food in America's Most Treasured Places showcases parks and concessionaires that have healthy and sustainable food programs in place and highlights a variety of best practices that can be adopted by other regional, local, and national parks.

Food for the Parks: A Roadmap to Success works as a toolkit offering strategies and ideas to inspire collaboration among partners and encourage them to take steps to create new healthy, fresh, and sustainable food programs in parks and other industries across the country.

 


 

New Report from the USDA

USDA_Food_pub

 

Click on image to get report

 

By Sarah A. Low and Stephen Vogel

 

Economic Research Report No. (ERR-128) 38 pp, November 2011

This study uses nationally representative data on marketing of local foods to assess the relative scale of local food marketing channels. This research documents that sales through intermediated marketing channels, such as farmers’ sales to local grocers and restaurants, account for a large portion of all local food sales. Small and medium-sized farms dominate local foods sales marketed exclusively through direct-to-consumer channels (foods sold at roadside stands or farmers’ markets, for example) while large farms dominate local food sales marketed exclusively through intermediated channels. Farmers marketing food locally are most prominent in the Northeast and the West Coast regions and areas close to densely populated urban markets. Climate and topography favoring the production of fruits and vegetables, proximity to and neighboring farm participation in farmers’ markets, and good transportation and information access are found to be associated with higher levels of direct-to-consumer sales.

 

 

 


 

 

Food_Commons_pic

 

The Food Commons is a proposed national network of physical, financial and organizational infrastructure that allows local and regional markets to operate efficiently and foodshed-based enterprises to cooperate, compete and thrive according to the principles of sustainability, fairness, and public accountability. It is a whole systems approach to localized food economies that includes  three integral components: 1) The Food Commons Trust 2) The Food Commons Bank, and 3) The Food Commons Hub.

 

For more information contact:
Larry Yee
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Jim Cochran
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

 

 


 

 

Final Results Journal of the Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development 2011 Poll

 

Survey_Results_2010

 

 

Local and Regional Food Systems for Rural Futures

 

Rural Futures Lab Foundation Paper No. 1

by Jennifer Jensen

Rural Policy Research Institute (RUPRI) Rural Futures Lab

 

Jen_Jensen

Click image above to get PDF of the report.

 

Starting with this paper, the RUPRI Rural Futures Lab hopes to explore the opportunities and challenges for rural people in the local and regional food movement, and food systems in general. This paper takes a wide-angled look at the changes within the U.S. food system, including differences between local, regional, and larger scale food systems, and what research and on-the-ground examples tell us about the benefits and drawbacks of the different types of food systems.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Food_Glossary

FOOD SYSTEM Wiki

A Collaboration of the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the

University of Wisconsin Madison and AgDevONLINE

 

This Wiki and its companion annotated bibliography were initiated as a class project for Urban and Regional Planning 711, Markets and Food Systems, at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and is administered by AgDevONLINE. This Wiki aims to present a comprehensive guide to all food system and agriculture development–related terms. It is our hope that these terms provide an accurate, normative overview of some everyday and some not-so-common phrases about this growing field.

 

 


 

The National Policy & Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity (NPLAN)

Announces New Publication in its Series

 

Gardens_legalThis toolkit is designed to help overcome the legal andpractical barriers to establishing community gardens on land that is not municipally owned. It provides several model agreements and other documents that can easily be tailored, simplifying the process of building an agreement that benefits both landowners and the community. Other publicatroins in the series include:

 

Model Policy: Establishing Land Use Protections for Community Gardens

 

Fact Sheet: Establishing Protections for Community Gardens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maines_future

 


 

 

 

Town Passes Controversial Local Food Ordinance

 

The following press release was provided by Food for Maine’s Future on March 7th.

SEDGWICK,  MAINE - On Saturday, March 5, residents of a small coastal town in  Maine voted unanimously to adopt the Local Food and Self-Governance  Ordinance, setting a precedent for other towns looking to preserve  small-scale farming and food processing. Sedgwick, located on the Blue Hill Peninsula in Western Hancock County, became the first town in  Maine, and perhaps the nation, to exempt direct farm sales from state and federal licensing and  inspection. The ordinance also exempts foods made in the home kitchen,  similar to the Michigan Cottage Food Law passed last year, but without  caps on gross sales or restrictions on types of exempt foods.

 

Local farmer Bob St.Peter noted the importance of this ordinance for beginning farmers and cottage producers.  “This ordinance creates favorable conditions for beginning farmers and  cottage-scale food processors to try out new products, and to make the  most of each season’s bounty,” said St.Peter. “My family is already  working on some ideas we can do from home to help pay the  bills and get our farm going.”

Mia Strong, Sedgwick resident and local farm patron, was  overwhelmed by the support of her town. “Tears of joy welled in my eyes  as my town voted to adopt this ordinance,” said Strong. “I am so proud of my  community. They made a stand for local food and our fundamental rights as citizens to choose that food.”

 

St.Peter, who serves on the  board of the National Family Farm Coalition, based in Washington, DC,  sees this as a model ordinance for economic development in rural areas.  “It’s tough making a go of it in rural America,” said St.Peter. “Rural  working people have always had to do a little of this and a little of  that to make ends meet. But up until the last couple generations, we  didn’t need a special license or new facility each time we wanted to  sell something to our neighbors. Small farmers and producers have been  getting squeezed out in the name of food safety, yet it’s the industrial  food that is causing food borne illness, not us.”

 

“And every food dollar that leaves our community is one more dollar we don’t have to pay for our rural schools or to provide decent care for our elders,” adds St.Peter. “We need the money more than corporate agribusiness.”

Three other towns in Western Hancock County will be voting on the  ordinance at or ahead of their town meetings in the coming weeks. Penobscot,  Brooksville, and Blue Hill all have the ordinance on their warrants.

 

Click here to view a copy of the Local Food and Self-Governance Ordinance of 2011.

Read the full article at Food for Maine’s Future.

 

 


 

 

New National Map Shows Limits to Supermarket Access

 

Minneapolis_map

 

Click on map to got to PolicyMap (click on the TRF Analytics tab)

 

The Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program and The Reinvestment Fund have released a new online video and interactive map addressing the challenges of making sure low-income neighborhoods have access to something most of us take for granted—a supermarket.  An estimated 2 million people do not live near a supermarket, which makes it harder and more expensive for them to purchase food and costs their communities millions of dollars in economic activity.

The new video, “Getting to Market,” describes why locating supermarkets in low-income communities is so important and what obstacles prevent this essential economic development.  The interactive map offers local stakeholders detailed information on the opportunities for supermarket placement and area economic development.  The focus is on 10 metropolitan areas across the country.

 

 


 

 

Don't believe Land Grants are providing leadership and

resources on local food systems?

 

Have a look at what's going on in North Carolina!

 

CEFS

Click image to visit CEFS

 

A sample of some of their projects:

 

Farmhand Foods, LLC

A business development project geared toward scaling the supply of local, pasture-raised meats. (www.farmhandfoods.com)

 

WFI: Wayne Food Initiative

A community-based food initiative in Wayne County (www.waynefoods.org).

 

RTI-CSA

A workplace-supported agriculture initiative at Research Triangle Institute (www.rti.org/csa).

 

Farm to Fork Statewide Initiative

A yearlong exploration of action opportunities for building a local, sustainable food system (www.cefs.ncsu.edu/cefsfarmtofork/home.html) with stakeholders across the state.

 

Buy 10% Local Food Campaign

A public education initiative to encourage consumption of foods grown and raised in North Carolina.

 

SARE PDP Community-Based Food Systems Training

Six new local food projects now well underway in counties across the state after the first year of training. First-year project teams are currently training second-year project teams on building local food systems.

 

Sustainable Local Foods Advisory Council

A new statewide legislated body tasked to facilitate the development of a sustainable local food economy in North Carolina.

 

 


 

 

 

Good_Food_Infrastructure

 

Click image to get PDF of Report

 

This report was developed with leadership from the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food System at Michigan State University, the Food Bank Council of Michigan and the Michigan Food Policy Council. This report, along with the others in the series, provides the foundation for the goals and agenda priorities put forth in the Michigan Good Food Charter.


From the Introduction: The good food problem we face is that most of the infrastructure needed for local and regional markets, which are growing, has washed out over the years like neglected roads and bridges. We have invested instead in building a superhighway to large national and global markets for Michigan food and farm products. These investments came primarily since the 1940s, when public and industry policy began to focus on producing food that is, as one industry insider describes it, “fast, convenient and cheap,” and government and industry leaders advised farms to “get big or get out.”

 


 

 

apa_pub

NEW APA Report!

 

Urban Agriculture: Growing Healthy, Sustainable Places

By Kimberley Hodgson, Marcia Caton Campbell, and Martin Bailkey

 

Urban agriculture is rising steadily in popularity in the United States and Canada—there are stories in the popular press, it has an increasingly central place in the growing local food movement, and there is a palpable interest in changing urban environments to foster both healthier residents and more sustainable communities. From community and school gardens in small rural towns and commercial farms in suburbs to rooftop gardens and bee-keeping operations in dense cities, urban agriculture is sprouting up across the country. This report provides authoritative guidance for dealing with the opportunities and challenges faced by cities and counties of varying sizes, economies, and locations in supporting and expanding urban agriculture. Through case studies, the report illustrates the range of local government efforts, policies and programs both emerging and in place, and reveals the differences among local governments in their approaches as they respond to the needs of the urban agriculture community.

 

For more information about this new report, visit http://planning.org/apastore/Search/Default.aspx?k=urban%20agriculture

 

 

 


 

 

 

Regional Food System Infrastructure


NEW REPORT from the


National Association of Development Organizations (NADO)

 

 

Livestock_infrastructure


The Western North Carolina Regional Livestock Center under construction
(photo courtesy of WNC Communities)

 

Limited access to regional processing facilities, slaughterhouses, dairy-bottling plants, cold-storage facilities, auction markets and distribution hubs hampers growth among small- and medium-size producers and limits their ability to offer their products to the regional market at affordable prices. Facilities that are needed in many regions to support regional food purchasing include shareduse or cooperative facilities such as processing, storage and distribution facilities, commercial kitchens or kitchen incubators for small businesses, and mobile processing facilities. Many regional development organizations (RDOs) and councils of governments are exploring how they can develop and support regional food systems infrastructure. Promoting small- and mid-size agricultural operations offers numerous benefits to a region, including sustained economic development, protection for regional farmland and rural landscapes, and reduced vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, sourcing food that is locally or regionally grown fosters a better understanding of food safety and supply issues in case of foodborne illnesses or contamination—something that is harder to trace in global food distribution networks. Finally, strengthening connections between regional farmers and area consumers can advance community nutrition and healthy living programs, such as farm-to-school projects and initiatives that support low-income populations, seniors and children. By developing partnerships with area farmers and other stakeholders, RDOs can help to develop regional food systems infrastructure that will support economic development initiatives and other program goals.

 

 

 

 

 


 

USDA Maps Farmers' Markets in the U.S.

 

farmersmarketsmap2

 

You can use this new, interaactive map from the USDA to search for markets and even enter new market locations. The USDA has also prepared a spreadsheet of the geographic coordinates of farmers' market locations so that food system developers can create their own maps. Market information included in the farmers' market database is voluntary and self-reported to AMS from market managers, state market representatives, state associations, and consumers.

 

 

 

 


NYC_FoodWoks

Click image to get PDF of full report

 

New York City Council Speaker Christine C. Quinn announced “FoodWorks New York,” a new effort by city council to produce the first-ever comprehensive plan to use New York City’s food system to create jobs, improve public health, and protect the environment. Critical goals that will be met by FoodWorks New York:

 

1. Improve the city’s food infrastructure. Too much of New York City’s food infrastructure is outdated and inefficient, which costs us jobs and damages our environment. We need to begin making key, targeted investments – creating better links between the city and upstate producers, and supporting a smart redevelopment of Hunts Point.

 

2. Create new and better jobs in the food industry. There are currently over 19,000 New Yorkers employed in the food industry, but the potential exists for many more. The Council is going to develop creative ways to expand local food manufacturing, and attract more food industry companies to the city.

 

3. Keep more local food dollars in the local economy. Food sales and services in the five boroughs constitute a $30 billion market, but only 2% of the fruits and vegetables coming through the Hunts Point produce market are grown in New York state. The council will pursue state legislation allowing the city to prioritize local producers; look to expand farmers markets and CSAs; and encourage more wholesalers, retailers, and restaurants to use regional products.

 

4. Reduce diet-related diseases like obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. Fifty-eight percent of all adults in New York City are overweight or obese, and more than half a million New Yorkers have been diagnosed with diabetes. We can fight this epidemic by bringing more healthy foods into low-income neighborhoods, enrolling more New Yorkers in Food Stamps and WIC, and helping more children to take advantage of free meals.

 

5. Reduce environmental damage from the production, transport, and consumption of food. Food in the U.S. travels an average of 1,500 miles before consumption, dramatically increasing both greenhouse gasses produced and energy consumed. We can get more food transported into the city by rail instead of by truck, expand urban agriculture, and create programs allowing restaurants and homeowners to more easily compost their food scraps.

 

To help develop FoodWorks New York, the council will be passing legislation that will require city agencies to report back on food-related measures. This data will help set ambitious but achievable goals, and better coordinate efforts across all levels of city government.

 

 


 

Kenyon College Food For Thought Program


 

FFT_Kenyon_College_logo

 

Food for Thought is an initiative to build a sustainable local market for foods produced in and around Knox County, Ohio. Directed by the Rural Life Center at Kenyon College, this collaborative effort is developing a countywide food system to enable area farmers to market their products to individual consumers and institutional buyers, including schools, hospitals, restaurants, grocery stores, and caterers.


Food for Thought benefits its community by:

  • offering farmers a stable and profitable market for their products
  • providing consumers with healthy, tasty, and nutritious food
  • educating the public about their food choices, farming, and local rural life
  • keeping more of the $130 million in annual food purchases within the county
  • supporting independent businesses
  • maintaining greenspace and rural character by sustaining family farms

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Tel: +1-740-427-5850


The director of the Rural Life Center is Howard Sacks, senior advisor to the president and National Endowment for the Humanities distinguished professor of sociology. Professor Sacks wrote a commentary in the JAFSCD Issue 1 Volume 1 entitled Why Aren’t There Any Turkeys at the Danville Turkey Festival? This article includes a description of the innovations and accomplishments of the Food for Thought program.

 

 


 


How Land-Use Planners Can Support Farm Innovation:


A Report from Canada

 

Food_and_Farming_jpg

 

By Dr. Nina-Marie Lister, MCIP, RPP of Ryerson University and the Ryerson Planning Students Graduate Farm Studio (Heather Britten, Amanda Chen, Chris Dickinson, Anna Henriques, Sharan Kaur, Jessica Krecklo, Jennifer Laforest, Nisha Shirali, Jill Sonego, Nick Weigeldt, and Evan Weinberg)


Purpose of this Guide
The primary purpose of this guide is to educate Sustain Ontario about how land use planning policy in the GGH affects the ability of farmers to innovate. It is intended to guide Sustain Ontario’s efforts in working toward its mandate by providing recommendations with respect to priority issues to be addressed.


In addition to recommendations for Sustain Ontario in particular, this guide contains land use policy recommendations that are directed at municipal-level land use policy-makers. The guide is intended to serve as a useful tool for policy-makers who may not be well-versed in agricultural land use policy or for those would benefit from guidance in the subject area.

 

 

 


 

The 30 Mile Meal Project

 

30_mile

The 30 Mile Meal Project is a collaborative initiative of the Athens County Convention and Visitors Bureau (ACCVB), the Appalachian Center for Economic Networks (ACEnet), and over 130 enterprises, organizations and individuals engaged in the region’s local foods economy. Partners include farmers, specialty food producers, Farmers Markets, CSAs, local foods retail markets, local food-themed events, independently-owned businesses incorporating local ingredients into their menus, and not-for-profits committed to access to and security of local foods. With Athens, Ohio, as the epicenter, the project reaches 69 towns and 10 counties within a 30-mile radius of Athens and is the most ‘local’ of locavore initiatives across the U.S.


How this initiative benefits people in the region, food producers, local eateries, food markets and not for profits focused on food issues


For local and visiting consumers:

Building on growing interest in the locavore movement and pushing the envelope on 100 Mile Meal initiatives, this 'super-local' effort assists residents and visitors in identifying and engaging with local sources of food. The ACCVB has created a 30 MM searchable map on its website (which has over 700 unique visitors a day) that directs customers to restaurants, bakeries, bars, farmers markets, farm stands, nurseries, stores, and events. Users are also able to identify sources for specific foods such as dairy products, meats, grains, vegetables, fruits, and beverages – see http://www.athensohio.com/30mile/map-main.php


Committed to local foods access for all, we work closely with Community Food Initiatives, a not for profit that supports increased local food security and self reliance through its community gardens, edible schoolyards program, seed saving initiative and the Donation Station project that gathers food and monetary donations at the Athens Farmers Market. This food is distributed to over 35 locations in Athens County. Halfway through 2010, the donation station had supplied over 25,000 pounds of fresh produce to those in need.


For our 30 MM partners: The project encourages collaboration among producers in sustaining, improving and expanding food-related enterprises and supports their local foods earnings through a variety of tools and events. Our 30 MM media and branding campaign puts the faces to the foods by showcasing these partners. Our partners utilize our collaborative branding tools (logos, a tag line, signage, and products) to promote their particular piece of the 30 Mile Meal pie (farm, food product, restaurant, festival, etc).


We maintain a public presence through our web pages (http://athensohio.com/30mile/) where people can sign up for our twice a month 30MM e-newsletter. Additionally we have launched a 30MM blog (http://30milemeal.wordpress.com/). In September 2010, we hosted our first annual 30 Mile Meal Week, a series of events around the region showcasing the depth and breadth of our local food assets. To learn more about the week’s events, see http://30milemeal.wordpress.com/2010/10/08/a-look-back-at-30-mile-meal-week/.


More information on the 30 Mile Meal Project:

Natalie Woodroofe

Athens County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Tel. +1-740-592-1819

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 



LOCAL FOODCHECK: A New Food System Tool
from England
0

 

FoodCheck

 

Download a PDF of the Local FoodCheck Handbook here


From the Local FoodCheck Handbook: The Foodcheck Handbook has been researched and written by the Countryside Agency. At Action for Market Towns, we are now pleased to take on the role of publishing and promoting the handbook as part of our broader commitment to carry forward the regeneration of the country’s market towns. This publication is not only a valuable tool for market towns to use but we see it as an excellent example of how to develop and share good practice amongst market town partnerships. We believe that the involvement of the two Beacon Towns who piloted the Foodcheck — Faringdon and Bridport — provides a model for future knowledge and skills exchange betweens towns across the country. We hope that this Handbook will be used to help develop local food networks around the country. Beyond this, we hope that it will also provide "food for thought" about how the skills and knowledge developed within towns can be best shared in future.


Chris Wade
Chief Executive
Action for Market Towns

The 30 Mile Meal Project is a collaborative initiative of the Athens County Convention and Visitors Bureau (ACCVB), the Appalachian Center for Economic Networks (ACEnet), and over 130 enterprises, organizations and individuals engaged in the region’s local foods economy. Partners include farmers, specialty food producers, Farmers Markets, CSAs, local foods retail markets, local food-themed events, independently-owned businesses incorporating local ingredients into their menus, and not for profits committed to local foods access and security. With Athens, Ohio as the epicenter, the project reaches 69 towns and 10 counties within a 30 mile radius of Athens and is the most ‘local’ of locavore initiatives across the U.S.

How this initiative benefits people in the region, food producers, local eateries, food markets and not for profits focused on food issues

For local and visiting consumers:

Building on growing interest in the locavore movement and pushing the envelope on 100 Mile Meal initiatives, this 'super-local' effort assists residents and visitors in identifying and engaging with local sources of food. The ACCVB has created a 30 MM searchable map on its website (which has over 700 unique visitors a day) that directs customers to restaurants, bakeries, bars, farmers markets, farm stands, nurseries, stores, and events. Users are also able to identify sources for specific foods such as dairy products, meats, grains, vegetables, fruits, and beverages – see http://www.athensohio.com/30mile/map-main.php

Committed to local foods access for all, we work closely with Community Food Initiatives, a not for profit that supports increased local food security and self reliance through its community gardens, edible schoolyards program, seed saving initiative and the Donation Station project that gathers food and monetary donations at the Athens Farmers Market. This food is distributed to over 35 locations in Athens County. Halfway through 2010, the donation station had supplied over 25,000 pounds of fresh produce to those in need.

For our 30 MM partners: The project encourages collaboration among producers in sustaining, improving and expanding food-related enterprises and supports their local foods earnings through a variety of tools and events. Our 30 MM media and branding campaign puts the faces to the foods by showcasing these partners. Our partners utilize our collaborative branding tools (logos, a tag line, signage, and products) to promote their particular piece of the 30 Mile Meal pie (farm, food product, restaurant, festival, etc).

We maintain a public presence through our web pages (http://athensohio.com/30mile/) where people can sign up for our twice a month 30MM e-newsletter. Additionally we have launched a 30MM blog (http://30milemeal.wordpress.com/). In September 2010, we hosted our first annual 30 Mile Meal Week, a series of events around the region showcasing the depth and breadth of our local food assets. To learn more about the week’s events, see http://30milemeal.wordpress.com/2010/10/08/a-look-back-at-30-mile-meal-week/.

More information on the 30 Mile Meal Project:

Natalie Woodroofe

Athens County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Tel. 740.592.1819

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
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